Linkou CGMHInternational Medicel CenterSite map

Update:2020/09/02


The Physicist Group

Medical physicists play a very important role in radiotherapy procedures.  Medical physicists mainly assist radiation oncologists in providing radiotherapy  and are responsible for establishing and carrying out all routine standard  operating procedures for quality assurance of all radiotherapy equipment in  order to ensure that patients receive the best quality of radiotherapy. The  medical physicist group is a team with professional knowledge and proficiency  in radiation physics and radiotherapy. All therapeutic equipment and  techniques introduced into the division have been comprehensively evaluated  and assessed by medical physicists before being used in clinical treatment.  Such techniques have included the first instance of stereotactic intracranial  radiotherapy (SRS) introduced in 1993, intensity modulated radiation therapy  (IMRT) in 2000, Novalis Radiosurgery in 2006, and RapidArc radiotherapy in  2009; the medical physicist group also received and tested proton therapy  equipment in 2014. The medical physicists not only conduct regular clinical  work, but are also responsible for seminars and trainings for physicians of the  division and radiation therapist interns. The division adapted the medical  physicist training system used in the United States when it was established.  All the chiefs of the division truly value the group and have sent staff to  renowned international hospitals for training or to attend processional  conferences. A number of medical physicists received training in the clinical  application of proton physics at various renowned proton therapy centers in  Japan and the United States, who, afterwards, became the key players in  advancing proton therapy in clinical application in Chang Gung Memorial  Hospital. With further technological advances in the future, more sophisticated and diverse radiotherapy equipment and techniques will be developed.  Therefore, medical physicists will face an increasing number of challenges.  They must constantly absorb new knowledge and stay up­to­date on new  clinical developments to maintain a world­class quality of the radiotherapy  techniques of the division, as well as to provide high­quality radiotherapy for  local cancer patients.